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Life Begins at One – Exciting Birthday Milestones For Ages 1-15

Congrats! It’s you’re first birthday! The path to adulthood is marked by ages that signify responsibility: 16, you can get your driver’s license; 18 you can vote,  join the Army, and enter into legally binding contracts; 21, you can numb your pain with alcohol, and 25 you can finally rent a car. These are certainly landmark birthdays that arrive with serious significance; but starting at age one (1), every year brings about new and exciting privileges and responsibilities.

 

 

 

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Age 1: You can play with unvaccinated kids. 

As long as you’re fully immunized.

Continue reading Life Begins at One – Exciting Birthday Milestones For Ages 1-15

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75th Annual “Dad Of The Year” Awards – Submissions Open

Dads Honored Nationally – Woke Dad, in partnership with the World Association of Dads (WAD), is now accepting submissions for this year’s “Dad of the Year” (DOTY) award. Now entering its 75th year, this award recognizes dads throughout the United States for the outstanding strength, commitment and love they exhibit as dads. This year, we encourage you to tell us about a dad you believe deserves consideration by nominating him at WokeDad.com. Taking a few minutes of your time to share their story with us could propel them to worldwide recognition!

Although most DOTY submissions are from close relatives, you don’t have to personally know the individual you nominate. Joan Robins, for example, had only had a fleeting exchange with Brian Jones when she nominated him in 2013. Joan happened to be the daytime manager of the Flying-J where Brian made history. “I saw this mountain of a man storm into the station with beads of sweat running down his face,” she said. Brian marched directly to the restrooms with his 2-year-old-daughter Wendy and then reappeared only seconds later inquiring about changing stations. “Yes, we have one in the women’s restroom,” replied Joan. “I need to change my daughter’s diaper. Can I go in there?” he asked with a note of desperation in his voice. As Joan considered the absurdity of Brian’s request, Brian simply marched into the women’s restroom. Joan saw nominating Brian as a way to help draw attention to a national issue. “The lack of changing stations is a struggle for moms as well, but I’m here to share the dad’s side of the story,” Joan emphatically concluded. Continue reading 75th Annual “Dad Of The Year” Awards – Submissions Open

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PSA: My Baby Was Choking. Thankfully, I was (Sort Of) Prepared

We all hope we’ll never be put in the position of having to save our baby’s life, but it could happen to anyone. It happened to me last week. While feeding Cheerios to my 11-month-old twin girls, Clementine started choking. Thankfully, I had taken an infant CPR class before the girls were born, and remembered the basic steps for a choking baby: If it’s a partial obstruction (coughing and/or breathing), let them work it out. However, if the airway is completely obstructed, immediately start alternating between back slaps and chest thrusts. This was clearly a total obstruction — Clemmy wasn’t coughing or breathing. As I jumped into action, Clemmy attempted to stick her little hand into her mouth. My technique wasn’t textbook, but after a few solid back blows, a cereal cluster flew out of Clemmy’s mouth. In the aftermath, we were both in tears.

Even though I was able to save her life, I found myself consumed with guilt. If she had gone unconscious, I would not have been prepared to perform CPR, which is way more technical than back slaps. The CPR instructor had advised us to review the outline every fews months, but I hadn’t looked at it since the girls were born. I could blame my neglect on any number of reasons: I was overwhelmed, it felt like homework, I lost the paperwork, etc. To be honest, I didn’t want to think about my babies dying. No one does — it’s paralyzing. On the other hand, CPR training greatly increases infant survival rates. If Clementine had needed CPR, and I was unprepared, I’d never be able to forgive myself.

To find a class in your area, visit the Red Cross website or call 800-733-2767 (800-RED-CROSS).